Pop and Mentos Experiment

by: Jasmine Futrell-McGee and Max Cowles



Pictures
Pop_in_Bin.jpegPop_in_Sink.jpeg
Pop Bottles after reaction Pop Bottle in Sink during reaction



Abstract
Mentos and Pop Experiment. Jasmine Futrell-McGee. Max Cowles In the Mentos and Pop Experiment three different types of Mentos Candies including the original Mint Mentos, Strawberry and Fruit, will be combined with four different carbonated beverages including Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Coke and Diet Coke. Upon the combination of these products, a fountain of foam will be created, thus leading to a loss of original liquid. The bottles of pop will be measured before and after the Mentos have been placed into them. The masses that are taken will determine how much liquid is lost, which will prove which combination of Pop and Mentos created the most successful reaction. After each reaction was carried out, the Diet Coke and Mint Mentos combination lost the most liquid, thus creating the biggest fountain of foam. From this evidence, we can conclude that the large porous surface of the Mint Mentos combined with the aspartame in Diet Coke, produces the most violent reaction.
Keywords: Aspartame, Surface Area



Data


Table 1
Pepsi + Mint
Pepsi + Strawberry
Pepsi + Fruit
Pop Alone
654.2 g
647.1 g
652.1 g
Mento Alone
5.7 g
5.6 g
5.5 g
Combined
659.9 g
652.7 g
657.6 g
After
335. 9 g
355.4 g
384.6 g
Amount Lost
318.3 g
291.7 g
267.5 g

Table 2
Diet Pepsi + Mint
Diet Pepsi + Strawberry
Diet Pepsi + Fruit
Pop Alone
624. 5 g
623. 9 g
619.3 g
Mento Alone
5.6 g
5.4 g
5.4 g
Combined
631.1 g
629.3 g
624.7 g
After
299.8 g
309.19 g
311.25 g
Amount Lost
324.7 g
314.8 g
308.1 g

Table 3
Coke + Mint
Coke + Strawberry
Coke + Fruit
Pop Alone
641.3 g
646.0 g
643.9 g
Mento Alone
5.6 g
5.5 g
5.8 g
Combined
647.0 g
651.5 g
649.7 g
After
344.1 g
357.5 g
344.2 g
Amount Lost
297.2 g
288.5 g
299.7 g

Table 4
Diet Coke + Mint
Diet Coke + Strawberry
Diet Coke + Fruit
Pop Alone
626.3 g
618.3 g
620.4 g
Mento Alone
5.6 g
5.6 g
5.6 g
Combined
631.9 g
623.9 g
626.0 g
After
246.38 g
245.02 g
256.43 g
Amount Lost
380.0 g
373.3 g
364.0 g


Control 1:
Pepsi + Fruit
Diet Pepsi + Fruit
Coke + Fruit
Diet Coke + Fruit
Pop Alone
642.9 g
623.7 g
644.0 g
626.9 g
Mento Alone
5.5 g
5.4 g
5.5 g
5.5 g
Combined
648.4 g
629.1 g
649.5 g
632.4 g
After
305.4 g
241.7 g
313.4 g
255.7 g
Amount Lost
343.0 g
387.4 g
336.1 g
376.6 g


Control 2:

Pepsi + Fruit
Diet Pepsi + Fruit
Pepsi + Fruit (Same Color)
Diet Pepsi + Fruit (Same Color)
Pop Alone
652.2 g
618.6 g
650.1 g
618.7 g
Mento Alone
5.4 g
5.7 g
5.7 g
5.6 g
Combined
657.6 g
624.3 g
655.8 g
624.3 g
After
309.0 g
234.6 g
290.0 g
235.2 g
Amount Lost
343.2 g
384.0 g
360.1 g
383.5 g

Article Summary


Tonya Coffey, a Physics professor at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina conducted a similar experiment using Diet Coke and Mentos. In her study with her Physics class they used both Diet Coke and Mentos among other carbonated beverages and sugar containing products. The basis of their experiment was to determine what type of reaction was taking place in this explosive display. Different and similar methods were use to come to the conclusion of reaction type. As in our experiment the mass before and after the experiment was recorded in oder to determine which Pop and product mixture created the most explosive reaction. While testing the pH changes specifically in the Diet Coke and Mentos trial, it was determined that the reaction was not acid-base because there was little change in the pH. Because the presence of carbonic acid and carbon dioxide are already known in the Coke products, the equilibrium between these is merely disturbed by the introduction of Mentos. Differently, if the reaction was in fact acid-base as it was when baking soda was used; the acid would have been neutralized. The active ingredients in mainly the pop seem to play a large role in the reaction that occurs; Caffeine, aspartame and potassium benzoate all allow for the carbon dioxide bubbles to be produced. Aspartame, which is a type of sweetener, works better for the creatin of bubbles than drinks that are sweetened with corn syrup as well as the benzoate, the combination of the two creates a large reaction of bubbles and mass lost. On the other side of the spectrum, the physical makeup of the Mentos makes the reactions different. The difference between Fruit and Mint Mentos are the coating. While the Fruit Mentos are contained in a waxy candy coating that reveals rough patches, Mint Mentos are also covered in rough spots. These areas of roughness on the surface of the Mentos work as growth sites for crabon dioxide, or bubbles, to be formed. The more area there is for the growth of these bubbles, the more explosive the reaction will be. Along with the varying space for growth sites, the force in which the Mentos fall is a contributing factor. While each of the Mentos is dropped, they travel to the bottom of the bottle, on the way down, bubbles begin to form and rise to the top of the bottle. The Mentos that have more growth sites often have longer reaction times until completion. The results of our tests and the tests done by Coffey and her students were similar; however their discovery of the reaction type was significant to the explanation of our results.

Works Cited :

Coffey, Tonya. "Diet Coke and Mentos: What is really behind this physical reaction?." American Journal of Physics 1.6 (2008): 8. p. 551-557. Web. 6+ Feb 2010. <http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=AJPIAS000076000006000551000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes&ref=no>.