Abstract:

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CO2 AND CARBONATED DRINKS. Claire. This experiment is designed to find out the relationship between carbon dioxide, sugar, and pH of carbonated beverages. The drinks are either placed on a hot plate to increase the temperature, allowing the CO2 bubbles to rise to the surface faster, or shaken and left over night. Both methods are reliable ways of relieving the CO2 from the beverages. A pH probe is used to test the pH level of all drinks before and after the carbon dioxide is released. The pH level generally increases after carbon dioxide has left the liquid. A higher pH that is closer to pH 7, which is the pH of water, is less acidic than a lower pH, such as pH 3. Mass is lost after CO2 is released, which makes sense because gas does have a mass. The pH level is dependent on the amount of CO2 and sugar in the beverages. Sparkling water and Java Monster (a non-carbonated coffee energy drink) had the highest pH levels before and after. Sparkling water is purely water and CO2, while Java Monster has no CO2. The high amounts of sugar and CO2 in Sprite and Mountain Dew show change in their pH, but are much more acidic than the previously mentioned drinks. Although Diet Coke has no sugar, it has harsh chemicals that replace sugar and still contains a lot of CO2, similar to that of Sprite and Mountain Dew. Thus, the pH level, sugar content, and the amount of CO2 are all dependent on one another.

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Diet Coke, Mountain Dew, and Sprite on hot plates


Results:

Trial 1:

SODA
MASS BEFORE OPENING
PH BEFORE HEATING
MASS AFTER HEATING
PH AFTER HEATING
SPARKLING WATER 1
371.1 grams
3.80 pH
367.4 grams

DIET COKE
627.6 grams
3.18 pH
620.8 grams
2.50 pH
SPRITE
640.4 grams
3.10 pH
634.9 grams
2.78 pH
MOUNTAIN DEW
654.4 grams
3.10 pH
650.5 grams
2.49 pH
JAVA MONSTER
475.8 grams
6.76 pH
472.1 grams
6.76 pH
MONSTER ENERGY DRINK
517.7grams
3.44 pH
511.4 grams
3.32 pH
SPARKLING WATER 2
367.3 grams
4.09 pH
361.8 grams
4.71 pH

Trial 1 Continuation: after a longer period of time…

MOUNTAIN DEW
648.7 grams
3.10 pH
SPRITE
633.3 grams
3.27 pH
DIET COKE
619.0 grams
3.15 pH

Trial 2:

SODA
MASS BEFORE OPENING
PH BEFORE HEATING
MASS AFTER HEATING
PH AFTER HEATING
SPRITE
642.9 grams
2.93 pH
636.4 grams
3.85 pH
MOUNTAIN DEW
652.6 grams
2.86 pH
647.5 grams
2.57 pH
JAVA MONSTER
480.8 grams
6.57 pH
478.1 grams
6.72 pH
MONSTER ENERGY DRINK
515.1 grams
3.24 pH
511.7 grams
3.58 pH
DIET COKE
628.6 grams
2.84 pH
620.3 grams
2.81 pH
SPARKLING WATER 2
LOOK
AT
LAST
TABLE

Results show that pH is dependent on the carbon dioxide and sugar content. It is shown above that the two drinks that have the highest pH (lowest acidity level) are Java Monster and Mendota Sparkling Water. From looking at these two drinks, it can be assumed that their amount of carbon dioxide and sugar content lead to these results. Java Monster has no carbon dioxide and the least amount of sugar out of all the sodas. Mendota Sparkling water is completely made up of just water and CO2. Again, there is little, or in this case, no sugar. Both drinks show to have the highest pH level, which is the closest to the pH level of water (pH 7). Although Diet Coke has no sugar, the sugar is replaced by harsh chemicals that affect the beverage in different, but also negative ways. In this case, Diet Coke's pH level isn't dependent on the sugar content, but what replaces the sugar in the drink. Sprite, Mountain Dew, and Monster all have a lot of sugar and carbon dioxide. They have the low pH levels, making them extremely acidic. After carbon dioxide is released from all of the drinks, the pH increases. This proves that carbon dioxide content affects the entire drink and pH level. Trial 1 was a practice run, and the pH probe showed numbers that didn't make sense. The pH wouldn't decrease (the beverage would not become more acidic) after the carbon dioxide escaped. Hence, we took another sample of Trial 1 the next day so the data could become more accurate. In conclusion, pH is dependent on the sugar and carbon dioxide content of a beverage.

Summary

Eun-Jeong Ha’s experiment is about “class-based nutrition intervention” and the relationship between soft drink and milk intake. According to Ha’s research, soft drink intake has increased over the years, while milk intake as decreased. This has made people more vulnerable to obesity, dental problems, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is essentially the loss of bone density, which can result in bone fractures. It is especially common among older women who haven’t consumed enough calcium over their lifetime. This experiment is trying to stress the importance of consuming enough milk and calcium not only during teenage years, but also throughout adulthood. The college students were placed in a classroom to learn about nutrition and healthy choices. Their awareness caused an increase of milk intake to occur. There was a noticeable increase in the female intake of milk, while male students seemed to have little change. Although both genders should be conscious of the amount of calcium their bodies are getting, females have a higher risk of developing health problems if they fail to have high calcium levels. Though the amount of soda that was consumed by both genders decreased, this did not lead to an overall large increase in milk consumption. This means that if a person decides to stop drinking soda, it should not be assumed that the person will decide to drink milk instead. Ha’s experiment stresses that there should be awareness not only among students, but throughout America, so everyone can limit their chances of having health problems related to their calcium intake.
Citation: Ha, Eun-Jeong, Natalie Caine-Bish, Christopher Holloman, and Karen Lowry-Gordon. "Evaluation of Effectiveness of Class-Based Nutrition Intervention on Changes in Soft Drink and Milk Consumption Among Young Adults." Nutrition Journal (2009): 1-10. Web. 16 Feb 2010. <http://www.nutritionj.com/content/8/1/50>

Nutrition Facts

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Mendota Sparkling Water
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Monster
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Mountain Dew
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Sprite
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Diet Coke
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Java Monster